This Juice Melts Cellulite and Burns Fat

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cellulite killer vivien veil

By:  Vivien Veil

This anti-cancer juice is exploding with ingredients that contain high levels of vitamins A and C

Regularly drinking this pure juice will affect every aspect of your life.  We all know that beauty comes from within; and once you begin hydrating your body with the most nutritionally perfect – organic liquid – everything about you will shine!  Your hair, your skin, your eyes, your nails, and your emotional thoughts – you will be wholly renewed and transformed.

Once the body and mind start operating on the fuel which God gave you – you will instantly feel energised!  This positive outcome will then spill over to all aspects of your life – your work, your relationships, and your self-confidence.

The ingredients in this juice expunges mucus and eradicates toxins.  Toxins and a too-acidic body contribute to weight gain.  The acidic residues infiltrate your cells – causing you to store fat.  The antioxidants in citrus fruit and the metabolism booster ginger join hands and saturate the cells – flushing out all the nasty bad stuff.

Plus, the fruit acids dissolve the mucus that are keeping those deadly acids hostage in your body.  Many of our favourite foods in the Western diet are loaded with acidity – creating acidic garbage in the bloodstream.  Such foods include dairy, meat, gluten-flour, coffee, alcohol, sugar, and even pollution.  It’s not harmful if you eat acidic foods in tiny amounts, but indulging on very acid-forming foods regularly places a burdensome task on the kidneys and liver.

The goal is to ALKALISE, DETOX, and REJUVENATE.

This living juice will help you destroy that toxic build-up.  After you develop a healthy nutritional lifestyle – loaded with living raw foods – the fat will just melt off.  So, join me as we kill those intruders with the potent ingredients listed below.

The main ingredient in my special elixir is – you guessed it – grapefruit!  Grapefruits are the largest members of the citrus family.  They originated outside of Asia and were hybridised in Jamaica (possibly a cross between a pommelo and a sweet orange).  A real popular ‘weight loss’ fruit, grapefruits are ‘eliminators’ – making them the ultimate detoxifier.  Your liver will love you once you start drinking these citrus delights.

Juice fasting with grapefruits (or eating them) for 3-7 days will detoxify your body.  It’ll clean out your colon and purify the fluids in your body.

Okay… Let’s start juicing! This zingy, zesty juice will instantly wake you and your senses up – making this an excellent breakfast juice.

Ingredients

  • 5 Grapefruits
  • 1 Lemon
  • 2 Limes
  • 1/4 Medium Pineapple
  • Handful of Ginger, you be the judge on how much to use

Instructions

  1. Cut the tops and bottoms of the grapefruits.  Then get a sharp knife and cut around the edges to peel off the skin.  Remember not to cut the white pith away – as it contains a ton of nutrients.  Do the same with the limes, pineapple, and lemon. (**You don’t need to peel the limes and lemon if you own a high-quality juicer)
  2. Juice the lemon, limes, ginger, and grapefruits. Then, juice the pineapple.
  3. Pour over ice.  Salud! (Cheers in Spanish for you non-Spanish speakers)

What’s So Important about Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is required for repairing and maintaining cells and bones – not to mention fighting off infections.  It even lowers your cancer and cardiovascular disease risks.  We need to continuously consume vitamin C rich foods – as our bodies don’t store vitamin C.

Health Benefits of Grapefruit Juice

  1. Cancer killer
  2. Lowers blood pressure
  3. Lowers cholesterol
  4. Makes you go number two by stimulating the digestive system
  5. Boosts the immune system
  6. Rich in vitamins A, C, folate, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, bioflavinoids, citric and phenolic acid, and pectin
  7. A great diuretic – helps reduce water retention
  8. Helps you lose weight
  9. Cellulite buster
  10. Powerful antioxidant and antimicrobial

Focus and Motivation During the Holidays

Focused During Holidays PictureBy: Gerhard de Bruin

The festival tidal wave of Christmas and New Year’s is looming ahead.  Yes, it’s only November, but it’s never too soon to begin planning for the mental onslaught they bring.  The holidays usually bring a host of undesirable consequences – less time training, weight gain, lack of discipline, and diminishing focus.  The typical person develops an iron-willed mantra:

The holidays are a time to relax and let loose.  I’ll get back on track come January.

From parties and family commitments to travelling and tempting meals – it’s no wonder that our clothes start to feel tight during the holidays.  Sadly, most people also lose the motivation to train hard, but it’s important to stay focused on your goals, so when New Year’s hits, you’re already ahead of everyone else.

Follow these strategies on how to stay on track during the holidays.  You must do whatever it takes to avoid going downhill with your training and nutritional goals.  Godspeed, soldier!  You’re going to need it!

1.  Prioritise and Plan

Devise your training schedule at least one month in advance.  Consistency and good time management techniques will bring you victory!  The holidays are an ideal time to stay loyal with your training and diet principles.  Sit down with your coach and outline your goals for the upcoming new year.  Discuss last year’s training and race results – and turn your past shortcomings into future strengths.  Don’t allow travelling to get in the way of exercising either.  If visiting family and friends will steer your training programme off path, create a way to use those travel days as recovery days.  You can afterwards intensify your workout plan to make up for those days.

Handle your time wisely!  Don’t try to be superman/superwoman.  Trying to perform too many tasks at once only brings stress and discouragement.  Wake up early and be realistic with what you can actually achieve within a time frame.  Simply following these tips alone will prevent burnout and loss of focus.

2.  Find Some Training Buddies

While solitary training allows you to press the mute button on the world, exercising with others can simplify your life and make training more enjoyable.  Working out with friends also gives you accountability.  It’s already tough waking up at ungodly hours to train, but you’ll be less likely to skip training knowing you’ve got a pal waiting for you.

Plus, working out with a friend or groups of buddies encourages a more positive mental outlook.  Believe it or not, social interaction and exercise play a pivotal role in the subconscious mind.  Researchers discovered this process called “social facilitation” with cyclists – they cycled faster when racing against someone else versus riding solo.  “The same holds true with runners.  When you run with others, you tend to give more effort,” says Cinda Kamphoff, Ph.D., a sports psychologist.  “You get caught up in the pace, and you might not recognise how fast you’re going.”

3.  Make Sleep a Priority

Lack of high-quality sleep negatively affects your training routine – not to mention your focus.  Sleeping more than seven hours a night helps  you stick to a solid exercise pattern and amps motivation.  Studies reveal that people who sleep more end up losing weight and reaching their goals.

Fatigue and sleep deprivation can easily drain motivation to exercise and even stops you from pushing yourself harder – therefore causing muscle loss and weight gain.  Your appetite grows when you sleep less.  You can’t properly hear the brain telling you to stop eating when you’re exhausted – instead, the signals to eat get louder.

The hormone that suppresses your appetite (leptin) is reduced, and the hormone that increases your appetite (ghrelin) becomes more active (Taheri et al., 2004).  “Hence, you can have a hard time differentiating between being hungry or tired.  In either case, cookies and chocolate can be very tempting,” states Nancy Clark, a board certified specialist in sports dietetics.

I often find myself feeling real tired and hungry at the end of a long training day.  I have to remind myself to get into bed, or else I’ll struggle to keep my weight and motivation in check.

4.  Join a Training Camp

Still need a push to reach your athletic objectives?  Many swear by enrolling in a great training camp.  Working alongside an elite coach might sound too extreme for some, but it’s definitely worth the expense if you require extra motivation, discipline, and are dead serious about taking your athletic performance to the next level.

Training camps during the holidays make a perfect active getaway, especially if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere during December, January, and February.  Warmer climates and professional guidance will fire up your fitness resolutions and encourage you to make better decisions.

In January, DBT Training Camp offers high-altitude training in beautiful Golden Gate, South Africa.  The camp takes care of everything for you, enabling you to gain better focus and best of all, you’ll come out of the camp with an insane amount of motivation to kick start the racing season.

5.  Set Mind-Blowing, yet Realistic Goals

Practice patience to achieve your dreams.  Impatience sets you up for disappointment and hopelessness.  Focus on  your progress rather than solely focusing on your sky-high goals.  That way you’ll discover whether or not your regimen is leading you closer or further away from you goals.

Pinpoint your goals on a regular basis, and understand the series of actions that you’re undertaking to achieve those goals.  The whole process of getting there is imperative, but having an awareness of the “bigger picture” assists you in staying motivated and focused during the fight to achieve your personal goals.

Keep a journal depicting your progress and track your athletic metrics every couple of weeks during the holiday season to remain inspired.

Source:  Taheri, S., L. Lin, D. Austin, T. Young, and E. Mignot. 2004. Short sleep duration is associated with reduced leptin, elevated ghrelin, and increased body max index. PLoS Med 1 (3): E62.

Original article can be found here